Free shipping on your purchases through December 9!

Yes, you read that right. I’m extending free shipping to all of my US customers during peak holiday shopping season. No coupon codes and no order minimum. My shop is able to receive order requests from US customers at this time. Valid through December 9, 2017.

See what is in the shop!

I’ve finished the waffleweave kitchen towels. The unbleached cotton towels are my favorite, I think. They feel fluffy and there is a pleasing sense of simplicity about them.

 

 

Six of these were made at a customer’s request and are already spoken for, but I allowed for a few extra for my shop.

The loom will be dressed in an overshot pattern this week. I’m really excited to see how this cloth shapes up; every pattern seems to result in a fabric with a unique personality. I’ll be weaving a black and white version for an exhibition, and I think a nice, bright cherry red would compliment this pattern, too. Pictures will be posted on my Instagram feed.

Happy Thanksgiving to my US readers!

Be well,

Kate K.

 

 

 

A week of waffles

The loom has been dressed with one of my favorite weaving structures this week, waffleweave! Waffleweave, which is really just a variation on a point twill, creates cloth that is right at home in the kitchen. The little cells shrink up to make a highly textured and absorbent cloth. It does, however, present some challenges to the weaver. I’ve found that when winding a warp for waffles, it doesn’t hurt to err on the side of “too much.” When I work with 8/2 unmercerized cotton for waffleweave, shrinkage is considerable. For example, with these towels, I am weaving 34 inches of waffleweave pattern in order to yield a 24 inch long towel after finishing. That’s a lot of shrinkage (30%!). Here’s the towel in process:

 

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Waffles in monochrome show off the texture of the cloth

 

I wove some waffles using a dark brown 8/2 unmercerized cotton warp and played around with some stripes using some bits of cotton from my stash:

 

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Chocolate waffles? Coffee waffles? 

Next up after the waffles will be a new overshot pattern for me, “orange peel.” I’m really looking forward to seeing how this pattern shakes out. I am basing my design off of the weaving draft found in the Josephine Estes weaving booklet, which you can access, too, right here:

 

Original Miniature Patterns for Hand Weaving by Josephine Estes

I’m sensing a theme here….waffles, orange peels…. I’m a sucker for a food-themed weaving structure.

Be well,

Kate K.

My handwovens take a trip to Maine

Today I made a short driving trip to South Berwick, Maine to drop off some of my work at the Sarah Orne Jewett House Museum. The Mistletoe & Holly Artisan Sale  begins next weekend and I am happy to include this historic venue among my current list of retailers. Here is a photo of the Sarah Orne Jewett House:

Sarah Orne Jewett House photo November.jpg

Sarah Orne Jewett House, South Berwick, Maine

I took up several overshot pieces, bamboo scarves, and of course, a selection of my handwoven kitchen towels. Here is the sage green towel that I was working on last week, all washed and hemmed:

Sage plaid with cranberries

Sage green and unbleached cotton kitchen towel

While a lot of my inventory is currently stocked in retailers in anticipation of the holiday shopping season, I have reserved a few designs here in the studio for online purchase either by visiting my shop or by clicking the links right here:

Handwoven waffleweave washing cloth

Handwoven 100% unbleached cotton washing cloth. Use in the kitchen or bath! Machine stitched hems. Size: 11.5″ x 10.25″. Machine wash and dry.

$12.00

Handwoven cotton kitchen towel in sage.

Handwoven kitchen towel in sage green and unbleached natural cottons. Measures 17" x 25". Machine stitched hems. Machine wash & dry.

$28.00


I’m working on finishing up a sister-version of the sage towel in red. Here it is on the loom:

 

Red plaid on loom

Red on the loom!

 

I’m really partial to red in the kitchen, I have to admit. Next up on the loom are some projects that I will be working on for gift-giving (top-secret stuff!) and also for private requests. It is always a busy time of year but that’s a good thing.

Be well,

Kate K.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FAQ: my handwoven kitchen towels

Blue farmhouse plaid towel

A handwoven kitchen towel!

 

I’m getting ready to send a collection of handwoven kitchen towels to the Sarah Orne Jewett House & Museum Shop in South Berwick, Maine; they host a holiday seasonal sale every year that features the work of artisans from New England. I won’t be onsite to answer questions about my items as I can at art fairs, so I put together a “FAQ” sheet about my towels to assist the museum staff and patrons. I thought I would share it here!

  • Will my towel shrink if I wash it in the washing machine?

Shrinkage will be minimal. After cutting the freshly woven fabric from the loom, I machine wash the fabric in hot water and use the high spin cycle option. I then machine dry the towel fabric on the cotton setting. These steps help to “set” the weave and any significant shrinkage is accounted for before hemming.

  • Will the colors run?

It is very unlikely. During the initial wash I include a color catcher sheet with the towel fabric. This step helps to pull out any residual dye leftover from the cotton milling/dying process.

  • Can I wash my towel in a machine?

Yes. Wash the towel at your preferred temperature and machine dry. Avoid chlorine bleach as this will discolor the yarns.

  • Do people really use these in the kitchen?

Yes. I like to weave items that you can live with on an everyday basis. The densely sett yarns create a thirsty fabric. Machine stitched ends hold up to heavy use. Some of my customers prefer to use their towels for bread basket displays, for the powder room, or even as substitute placemats or small-sized table toppers.



Speaking of towels, I started working on another batch today. Here is the first towel, just underway:

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Sage green and unbleached cotton kitchen towel

I will also be weaving this same pattern with a nice Christmas-y red cotton yarn as the main color. Be sure to check my shop for my latest additions! I also added a couple of new scarves to the shop this week:

 

 

 

 

 

I best get cracking on those kitchen towels! Happy November, friends.

Be well, Kate K.

 

Bamboo, I love you…

Yes, I love weaving with bamboo! I first started working with it this past summer almost by accident. I was working with my sales rep from one of my suppliers discussing a couple of items that were on long-term backorder and on a whim I switched my yarn selections from the backordered 3/2 mercerized cotton to the in-stock bamboo. A cone of natural and black 5/2 bamboo showed up at my door later in the week and I had to figure out what to do with the yarn. I decided to start with the basics, plain weave, so that I could learn how the yarn and resulting fabric behaved.  I drafted a scarf pattern that ended up being a best-seller at the League of NH Craftsmen Summer Fair in August:

Log Cabin Bamboo Scarf Black Ivory

Bamboo scarf with log cabin borders

This item was the first design to sell out at my booth this year, which was a delightful surprise. The silky-smooth feel of the bamboo is what really appealed to my customers. It is lightweight and has a subtle sheen. I don’t know about you, but I really dislike having a heavy garment around my neck. I guess that is why I generally prefer lightweight yarns for my wearables (fine alpaca/silk, 8/2 lyocell, and bamboo being my favorites).

I started weaving a few more of these this log cabin bamboo scarves this week in ecru and black and also have a warp ready to go in lavender and black bamboo. To see these works in progress, please check out my Instagram page.

New in the shop this week are some diamond twill towels in a colorway that I’m calling “Flower Garden”:

 

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“Flower Garden” Diamond Twill Kitchen Towels

I’m reserving six of these for my online shop and six will be heading to the Sarah Orne Jewett Museum Shop for their seasonal holiday sale, South Berwick, Maine, which beings in November.

Signing off for now. The bamboo is calling for me.

Be well,

kate k.

 

Loom for sale & new kitchen towels

NOTE: The loom has been sold! Thank you for looking! Updated Nov. 2017.

My husband and I are “right-sizing” our home and belongings over the course of this year. As such, I have attempted (not for the first time) to make do with the yarn options that I currently have on hand in lieu of placing large orders of cotton, tencel, or bamboo. A diamond twill kitchen towel that I designed this summer has worked out really well to help me work through small cones of 8/2 ummercerized cotton. I generally work with between 4-6 colors in the warp for each colorway. Here is one of my latest combinations:

Jewel tones diamond twill towel

Diamond twill kitchen towels in jewel tones

I will be sending some of these towels off to the Sarah Orne Jewett House  in South Berwick, ME for their annual seasonal holiday sale. However, if you can’t make it to Maine in November or December, I have reserved a few of these gems for my online shop inventory.

 

In an effort to forward our “right-sizing” goals, I am also looking for a new home for my small Harrisville Designs direct tie floor loom. If you’re interested in learning more about the loom, please visit this document. It is a great little loom for novice weavers, or for those interested in doing demonstrations. Here is a picture of me working at the loom during an artisan fair:

Me with Harrisville loom

If you have any questions about the loom or the kitchen towels shown above, please contact me. It would be lovely to chat.

 

Three reasons why I love to wind warp chains

Hello, friends. One of my favorite steps in the weaving process is winding the warp. I will admit that I was less enthusiastic about this necessary step when I was limited to using a warping board. I found the board to be fatiguing; perhaps if I had a wall-mounted warping board it would have been less so, but I always ended up perching the thing on the floor and it was just a major chore. Then my husband got me a warping reel!

warping reel

Blue 8/2 cotton on the warping reel

This is a Harrisville Designs (made right here in the lovely state of New Hampshire) reel and I really like using it. I confess that I often have more warp chains waiting to be put on the loom than is really necessary. Here are my top three reasons why I love warp chains:

 

  1. It is relaxing! People at art shows often comment that weaving “must be so relaxing.” I rarely find this to be the case (weaving and especially warping the loom require a fair amount of attention to detail) with the exception of winding the warps. Sometimes I listen to music, sometimes I prefer the quiet or, weather permitting, I open a window.
  2. Get off yer arse! As I approach my fiftieth birthday (yikes!) I find that it behooves my hips and backside to take frequent breaks from sitting at the loom bench and stand up for a while; why not wind a warp if I’m just going to stand around, right?
  3. Play with color: Winding warps takes me back to my finger painting days, in many instances. Obviously this isn’t always the case (it is a function of the design, really, and many of my warps are monochrome), but it sure is fun to play around:

 

Warp chains

Warp chains are my eye candy

 

These chains will (someday soon) be more of my diamond twill kitchen towels. But until I finish my overshot table runners that are on the loom, the chains will have to wait:

 

Black snowballs overshot

Black and ivory overshot on the loom

I like weaving these small centerpiece-sized table toppers and, based on customer interest, I’d say that there is every reason to weave smaller items like this. They look really pretty on a dining table, especially on top of a simple clean cloth. They also pair well with smaller furniture pieces, like the one I have here on an antique bureau:

 

 

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Overshot in brown and ivory

I took a big leap recently and ordered myself some custom-woven ribbon labels for my handwoven pieces. Pictures to follow, once I actually cut some cloth from the loom!

Be well, friends.